Breaking Down An Effective Print Ad

I saw this ad on the way to work on the El and thought it was really effective (or at least compared to the other ads on the train). Specifically:

  • Effective layout and content – I glanced at this for 3 seconds and immediately knew what the ad was for.
  • Great imagery – I can see what running in the race downtown would be like. (Bonus points if they had used the behavioral technique of visualizing my future and had an image of people celebrating as they crossed the finish line instead. I know it would have gotten me thinking how great it would feel to finish the race)
  • Call To Action – visit the site!  It’s an easy URL to remember too.
  • Urgency – the $10 discount that expires at the end of the month makes me realize I’d better act soon. And the discount code is easy to remember.

Now, as much as I like this ad, having just had another kid, I’m not gonna register for this race. But kudos to the designers and I’m sure they’ll fill up the 15,000 spots quickly.

Want a free analysis of one of your ads? Drop me a line.

Marketing 101: Always Include A Call To Action

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Not having a CTA is like a local car dealership paying for a TV ad without the “Come on down to ______ and see our great deals” at the end.

I like NatureBox – they mail you snacks each month.  I bought a subscription for my wife as a Christmas gift because she works from home and likes to snack between meetings/calls.  They have good food (although I’m not sure it’s so healthy).

I was excited to see they’re now offered in select Target stores – got a coupon to get a free bag in our last NatureBox.  I also got the above flyer to refer a friend.  I would definitely have done it, but there was no Call To Action – no “log onto naturebox.com, visit natureboxreferrals.com” – nothing.  Now I know that I probably need to log onto the site, but at this point, I’ve lost interest.

Key lesson? Include a CTA on all marketing (especially really expensive print materials!) and make sure you’re providing clear, detailed instructions if there are many steps needed for the person to take the action you want them to take.

Want a free analysis of your current marketing campaigns? Drop me a line.

 

Picking The Right Image To Spur Action

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Yesterday I saw this ad on the train ride home. Now it’s been a while since I’ve dated, but I don’t remember many dates where I was tickling her neck while drinking tea. Nor am I sure that’s a dream date for girls.

My sad dating history aside, the real issue I see with this ad is that it seems to have nothing to do with how GrubHub can help me dazzle my date. It might have if it was a picture of two people eating some delicious food on a sofa while watching TV. Or maybe in a park eating…

And so ultimately GH failed to get me to take action by ordering dinner through their app. Instead I spent 2 minutes wondering what the design team (or agency) for this ad was thinking and then 5 minutes writing this post.

I’m all for real world imagery in products and ads since they get the audience to envision a scene (aspirational or realistic). But they need to inspire action, like this other ad I saw on the train.